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Fly Fishing

Fly Fishing Rod
For the usual form of fishing which involves casting and spinning, it is the force exerted to cast the lure, combined with its weight which draws out the line from the reel. On the other hand, in fly fishing, it is the weight of the line that is responsible in pulling the lure attached to the leader at the end. The rod movement is dependent on the weight of the line. Upon back casting, the line is extended behind the caster which bends the rod because of its weight. As the rod straightens, it bends forward, it catapults the line forward, with the lure right behind it, the lure in fly fishing is more correctly termed as flies and bugs since they exhibit a distinct likeness to the creatures that they imitate, as compared to the plugs, spoons and jigs used in the other types of fishing.

The "lures" used for fly fishing, which most properly are called flies and bugs, in most respects are far more natural, more lifelike, more genuine representatives of real insects or minnows than are plugs, spoons, and jigs commonly used in other kinds of fishing. 

There are several thousands of flies and bugs available for the avid angler. Classification for each is a Herculean task not to mention identifying them all. For the basis of clarification, a wet fly sinks in water while a dry fly floats. A bug is similar to a dry fly since it also floats. Materials such as cork or light wood are used to make a bug. It usually resembles a frog, mouse, or locust.

Fly fishing can be used to catch most types of game fish such as the trout, American Grayling, Bluegill, Shad, Tarpon, Northern Pike, White Bass, Perch, and Crappie, which actually contributes to its attractiveness to anglers who are just starting. It even seems that these fishes were created just for the fly fishermen's pleasure. Since the fishes are attracted to other fish or creature when they are hungry, a well presented fly or bug will be at the mercy of the fish, or probably the other way around. Only those fish who reside in the deep are not accessed by basic fly fishing methods.

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